Tag Archives: Ben Whishaw

FILM REVIEW: Mary Poppins Returns (2018)

Few can deny the timeless appeal of the original Mary Poppins. Led by the legendary Julie Andrews in her feature debut, the 1964 classic boasted a much-loved soundtrack by the Sherman brothers, some of the most memorable dance sequences ever seen on screen, and of course, animated dancing penguins. As portrayed in 2013’s Saving Mr Banks, Poppins’ creator, P.L. Travers, was pursued by Walt Disney for the rights to the film for over twenty years, and was not at all happy with the end product when it did eventually come to fruition. Travers rejected the concept for a film sequel in the 1980s, and acquiesced to the stage musical adaptation (which premiered in 2004, eight years after her death) on the grounds that no one from the original film – the Sherman Brothers in particular – be involved. Fast forward to 2018, a whopping fifty-four years since the original magic, and Poppins is back on screen. The sequel was approved by Travers’ estate but one can only assume she would not be thrilled; the penguins are back and they’re dancing on her grave. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Mary Poppins Returns (2018)

FILM REVIEW: The Danish Girl

The Danish Girl (Tom Hooper, 2015)

Something smells like Oscar bait. Or maybe it’s just Tom Hooper. The Danish Girl has more than a whiff of Hooper’s usual winning formula which has previously resulted in Oscar glory for The King’s Speech (which won awards for best picture, director, original screenplay, and actor), and Les Misérables (wins in smaller categories, with further nominations including best picture). His latest effort is arguably of the same quality, however Hooper and the film have missed out on directing and picture nominations this year. Is that because the Academy know his game all too well now, or because they aren’t sold on the subject matter? Continue reading FILM REVIEW: The Danish Girl

FILM REVIEW: Suffragette

We’ve come so far, we’ve got so far to go. Suffragette acts as both a reminder of the progress made in the fight for gender equality, while remaining relevant in 2015, a year in which the gender pay gap, domestic violence, and objectification of women still continue to be significant issues. And that’s in the developed countries. Hark back over a hundred years to when women had to fight for the vote, and Suffragette provides a beacon of hope that change can happen if you fight hard enough for it. Unfortunately this message gets lost in a film that loses sight of the bigger picture. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Suffragette

FILM REVIEW: Spectre

Spectre (Sam Mendes, 2015)

Bond is back! Even if it’s somewhat reluctantly, with Daniel Craig recently decrying his role in the films that catapulted him into the spotlight. Although contracted to do one more Bond film after this one, he’s on record as saying he’d rather slash his wrists than do another one (yes, poor him with his £39 million pay check). Only time will tell, but for now we have Bond 24, a.k.a. Spectre. The question on everyone’s lips: will it be as good as Skyfall? Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Spectre

FILM REVIEW: The Lobster

The Lobster (Yorgos Lanthimos, 2015)

If you’re sick of the constant remakes, reboots, biopics, book adaptations, and mindless action films that together make up the bulk of your options at the cinema, then Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster will be a welcome relief. Currently in limited release, its premise is about as weird as you can get, but you can also be assured that it isn’t alienating in a no-one-will-get-this-unless-they-are-a-film-wanker kind of way. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: The Lobster

FILM REVIEW: Paddington

Paddington (Paul King, 2014)

After more than fifty years, Michael Bond’s beloved children’s book character comes to life, and he is one adorable bear. Seemingly sticking quite close to the original story – though not quite enough according to the diehards – Paddington ventures from darkest Peru to the hustle and bustle of London town.

Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Paddington