Tag Archives: filmblerg

Film Review: DANCE ACADEMY: THE MOVIE

Dance Academy: The Movie (Jeffrey Walker, 2017)

Picking up eighteen months after the events of the last season, the movie adaptation of ABC series Dance Academy (2010-2013) sees Tara (Xenia Goodwin) miserable as she works at the Sydney Opera House bar and participates in a writing course. Having broken her back as a result of slipping on a bead at an audition, she has temporarily given up her dream of ballet. But when she is given the chance to audition for the National Ballet Company by artistic director Madeline Moncur (Miranda Otto) she throws her all into reigniting her passion for dance. Continue reading Film Review: DANCE ACADEMY: THE MOVIE

Film Review: THE BOSS BABY

The Boss Baby (Tom McGrath, 2017)

Alec Baldwin returns, but this time it’s not as Trump. It’s as a baby. (So actually, still close enough). Based on Marla Frazee’s picture book of the same name, The Boss Baby is brought to the screen by screenwriter Michael McCullers and director Tom McGrath. Continue reading Film Review: THE BOSS BABY

FILM REVIEW: Beauty and the Beast (2017)

Beauty and the Beast (Bill Condon, 2017)

It’s finally here. The live Disney musical we’ve all been waiting for. Twenty-six years after the animated original (one of the few animated films with an Oscar nomination for Best Picture), the live adaptation of Beauty and the Beast graces our screens. While it’s not the first live action adaptation of a much loved Disney animated classic – following Maleficent, Cinderella, and The Jungle Book – it is the first to retain its most crucial element: the music. Does that then mean it’s simply an unnecessary rehash? It’s depends on your level of pessimism, your fondness for nostalgia, and possibly how much you value animation. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Beauty and the Beast (2017)

FILM REVIEW: Lion

Lion (Garth Davis, 2016)

Many will be familiar with Saroo Brierley’s story, having previously been covered some years back by 60 Minutes. Now it gets the big screen treatment in Lion. Five-year-old Saroo (Sunny Pawar) gets lost in Calcutta, India, 1600km from home, unable to find his way back to his brother Guddu (Abhishek Bharate) and mother Kamla (Priyanka Bose). Living on the streets for three weeks before being transferred to an orphanage, Saroo is then adopted by Australian couple Sue (Nicole Kidman) and John Brierley (David Wenham) and goes to live with them in Hobart. As an adult, Saroo (now played by Dev Patel) becomes fixated on finding his birth mother to let her know he is safe, turning to Google Earth for help. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Lion

FILM REVIEW: Fifty Shades Darker

Fifty Shades Darker (James Foley, 2017)

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner surely there’s no better time to release the next film in the Fifty Shades trilogy. Because nothing says true love like a good old dose of domestic violence. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Fifty Shades Darker

FILM REVIEW: Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life

Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life (Steve Carr, 2016)

It can be so heartening to see the quality of films on offer for the younger audience. On the animation front they’re spoilt for choice, with Disney, Pixar, Dreamworks Animation and Illumination Entertainment all providing top quality choices. And recently we were treated to one of the great teen films of this generation with The Edge of Seventeen. But for every gem, there are usually multiple piles of steaming crap. Unfortunately, Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life falls into the latter category. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life

FILM REVIEW: The Edge of Seventeen

The Edge of Seventeen (Kelly Fremon Craig, 2016)

Teen films are often guilty pleasures. They tend to tick the boxes of every cliché, and while they often have an audience willing to eat them all up, they are rarely critically acclaimed. Occasionally there are exceptions; Tina Fey’s Mean Girls – based on the parenting book, Queen Bees and Wannabes – tore down the very real destructive girl clans that exist in every school; 2013’s The Spectacular Now focused on the misery behind the bravado of a popular guy and the influence of parenting on emotional development. Now we have another to rival them all with The Edge of Seventeen. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: The Edge of Seventeen