Tag Archives: Sam Claflin

FILM REVIEW: Me Before You

Me Before You (Thea Sharrocks, 2016)

Based on the novel by screenwriter Jojo Moyes, Me Before You is director Thea Sharrock’s feature debut. Starring a pair of beautiful Brits, it deals with dark subject matter, and viewers are best advised to carry tissues and to go easy on the mascara if you don’t want to look like a panda by film’s end. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Me Before You

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FILM REVIEW: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 (Francis Lawrence, 2015)

I may be scorned for saying that The Hunger Games is my favourite trilogy, but give me teenagers fighting to the death over Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, or The Godfather any day. The first two films – The Hunger Games and Catching Fire – set a high bar for the dystopian future teen genre, with nothing yet coming close in quality. The first film instalment of the third book, Mockingjay, was somewhat underwhelming in comparison, serving merely as a set-up for the final showdown. But with Mockingjay Part 2 there’s a return to form, in what is the most thought-provoking film of the bunch. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2

FILM REVIEW: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 (Francis Lawrence, 2014)
clairestbearestreviews_filmreview_hungergames_mockingjay_jenniferlawrence_posterAs exciting as the release of a new Hunger Games instalment can be, I had some reservations about Mockingjay – Part 1. Despite being the shortest book in the trilogy (by a few pages) its filmmakers are following in the footsteps of Harry Potter and the Twilight series and splitting the final novel in two – ah, that old chestnut.  Continue reading FILM REVIEW: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1

FILM REVIEW: Love, Rosie

Love Rosie (Christian Ditter, 2014)

It’s high time we got a good dose of sap in a decent rom-com. Even if we all know where it’s heading. Love, Rosie is based on Cecelia Ahearn’s novel, Where Rainbows End, with the setting shifting from Dublin to London. Ahearn’s work has been successfully adapted for the screen before, in the tearjerker P.S. I Love You, and Love, Rosie lives up to its predecessor, perhaps even surpassing it. Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Love, Rosie